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VOTE NO! - ON AMENDMENT 19

MARIJUANA - MEDICINAL MARIJUANA BALLOT ISSUE ==== MEDICAL USE OF MARIJUANA PETITION BY THE "CMR"; IS "CONTROL"; NOT "FREEDOM"!

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THIS IS A VEIL OF GOVERNMENTAL CONTROL TO IMPOSE A "BLACKLIST" FOR FUTURE PERSECUTION OF WHAT IS SEEN TODAY AS A COUNTER-CULTURE; AND FEES FOR US TO PAY IN ORDER TO BE FREE!

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THIS WILL DEPRIVE US AND INCRIMINATE US IF WE DO NOT FOLLOW GOVERNMENT GUIDELINES AND DEADLINES IN ORDER TO USE CANNABIS FREELY!

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THIS IS A VEHICLE TO FORCE US INTO CLAIMING THAT IF WE SMOKE "POT"; WE HAVE DEBILITATING MENTAL AND PHISICAL ILLNESSES!

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THIS IS TO SET UP CANNABIS FOR A CORPORATE MARKET THAT WE WILL HAVE TO SUCCUMB TO!

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THIS MAY FREE THE PERSON; WHO AGREES TO THESE TERMS; TO SMOKE "POT" WITHOUT BEING CHARGED WITH A CRIME; BUT WILL FURTHER INCRIMINATE THOSE WHO WILL SUPPLY IT TO THEM!

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THIS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE LEAGALIZATION OF "MARIJUANA"!

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THE "CMR" (COLORADO CITIZENS FOR MEDICAL RIGHTS); IS REALLY THE "AMR" (AMERICANS FOR MEDICAL RIGHTS); WHICH IS ENDORSED, BACKED AND INVESTED UPON BY: "THE INFAMOUS" - GEORGE SORROS - INTERNATIONAL MILLIONAIRE AND BUSINESS MAN; WHO HAS GIVEN TO WORLD CHARITIES; BUT HAS ALSO FUNDED WARS AND ATROCITIES. HE HAS HELPED SAVE AND FEED THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE AND HAS ALSO HELPED KILL AND DESTROY THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE AS WELL!

CAN WE AFFORD TO HAVE AN ORGANIZATION LIKE THIS; AND A LEADER LIKE THIS; STAND IN THE FOREFRONT OF A "GRASSROOTS" MOVEMENT?!

AND WE LITERALLY SAY "GRASS"-ROOTS!!!!

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THIS IS NOT THE TIME FOR THIS KIND OF LEGISLATION!!

THE "COLORADO HEMP INITIATIVE" IS THE DIRECTION THAT WE SHOULD ALL TAKE IF WE ARE GOING TO ESTABLISH "TRUE" FREEDOM IN THE "FREE" WORLD!!! ========

THE "CANNABIS FOR COMPASIONATE USE" BALLOT PETITION; DID NOT SUCCEED THIS YEAR TO GET ON THE ELECTION BALLOT FOR THE STATE OF COLORADO. IT DID NOT RECEIVE ENOUGH SIGNATURES OF SUPPORTERS TO MAKE IT THERE;

(BECAUSE ALL YOU "POTHEADS" OUT THERE WERE TOO STONED TO REALIZE THAT YOU WERE SIGNING THE WRONG BALLOT PETITION!!!)

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SO VOTE NO! ON AMENDMENT 19; AND LET'S GET IT RIGHT NEXT YEAR AND MAKE THIS A MOVEMENT WHERE YOU CAN STAND UP FOR YOURSELVES; AND TRULY BE HEARD; INSTEAD OF LETTING THE "BIG SUGAR DADDY" TAKE YOU BY THE HAND TO LEAD YOU THERE!!!

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Although we support the use of Marijuana; and its intriguing effects;

We Beg to differ with Medical Propaganda; and Medical Laymen!

Cannabis is said to be a relief for debilitating disease; which is true! But some of the diseases it helps treat; are sometimes the diseases caused by the Cannabis (Marijuana). It is also said it increases appetite.

The Rev. Kefa accuses this drug to have treated the pains of seizures he has had throughout his history of using "Marijuana"; yet it is the very same drug:"Marijuana" that has caused these seizures in the first place. He claims he has atrophied the left side of his brain; and his Cerebral Cortex; and also has dammaged his vision in his left eye. And it certainly does not increase his appetite; it curbs it!

Some other people blame that although Marijuana does not cause Cancer; it has caused fibrosis in the lungs, emhyzema-like conditions; low levels of Oxygen in the brain, shortness of breath, cognitive impairment, forgetfullness, and most certainly: Depression.

DESPITE the Rev.Kefa's claims and the claims of others; it is known that 400 diiferent poisons have been found in the cannabis plant besides the active ingredient "THC" (tetrahyrocanibinol); But none of these poisons have been confirmed and recorded as having ever caused disease in Humans.

Although there are many pesticides, parasites, and molds that are often found on the plants.

These properties are consumed in the lungs of those who smoke Cannabis; and are known to cause nuerological damage in people.

It is wise to have quality control by an honest government; but do we have that here in America! Especially after the numerous accusations against the Pentagon through the decades of using profits from street drugs to fund their wars!

Now this doesn't happen to everyone; but it happens to a percentage of people. And even if that percentage is small; it is still effecting someone; and that one is even too much!

All we are saying that the Medicinal Value of "Marijuana" is still debatable; and shouldn't be the excuse to pass a law for.

"Marijuana" is an enjoyable thing; if you use it WISELY and RESPONSIBLY!

And that should be YOUR - perogative - to choose;

NOT THE GOVERNMENT'S !!!!!!!! ************ OOOOOO ***********

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COLORADO STATEWIDE BALLOT PROPOSAL FOR THE GENERAL ELECTION OF TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1998 TO THE LESISLATIVE COUNCIL OF THE COLORADO GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

BALLOT PROPOSAL PETITIONED BY THE "CMR" (COLORADO CITIZENS FOR MEDICAL RIGHTS)

Amendment 19 MEDICAL USE OF MARIJUANA

The proposed amendment to the Colorado Constitution:

1. allows patients diagnosed with a serious illness and their care-givers to legally possess marijuana for medical purposes. Care-givers could determine dosage strength and frequency of use;

2. allows individuals charged with possession or use of marijuana to defend themselves on the grounds that they are in legal possession for medical purposes;

3. establishes an exception to the state's criminal laws for physicians to provide written recommendations, other than a prescription, for patients to use marijuana for medical purposes;

4. requires the Governor to identify a state agency to establish a confidential state registry of patients and their care-givers who arc permitted to possess marijuana for medical purposes;

5. allows possession of two ounces of usable marijuana and six marijuana plants, and provides an exception to those limits if medically necessary

6. prohibits the medical use of marijuana by patients less than 18 years of age except under certain conditions;

7. provides that distribution of marijuana by anyone would still be illegal;

8. provides that health insurance companies do not have to reimburse patients for the medical use of marijuana; and

9. allows employers to prohibit the medical use of marijuana in the workplace.

Background

Federal law lists marijuana as a controlled substance that has no accepted medical use in the United States. Marijuana is classified as a Schedule I controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Administration, a federal law enforcement agency. Other Schedule I drugs include heroin, LSD, some chemically altered forms of amphetamines, and several other forms of hallucinogens. In 1976, federal law approved limited research to investigate use of marijuana for medical purposes. Under the research program the federal Drug Enforcement Administration approved distribution of marijuana to program participants. Fifteen patients with a variety of illnesses, and under the care of different physicians, originally participated in the program, which was suspended in 1992. Eight of the original patients are still receiving marijuana for medical use. There are no known study results published by the physicians who participated in this program. Since 1976, many drugs have been developed to treat the conditions originally assumed to be treatable with smoked marijuana. In addition, the hallucinogenic content of street marijuana has increased 400 to 500 percent since the experiments in the 1970s.

Similar to the federal law, in 1981, Colorado law provided for a program that would have allowed life-threatened cancer and glaucoma patients who did not respond to conventional drugs to use marijuana for medical purposes. The program, which was never implemented, was repealed from state law in 1995.

Current Colorado law prohibits the possession, distribution, and use of marijuana. Passage of this measure would legalize registered patient possession and use of marijuana for medical purposes in Colorado; however, it would still be illegal to distribute marijuana. The proposed measure does not provide enforcement mechanisms, and would require the General Assembly to adopt legislation to establish controls and the identification registry.

Arguments For

1. Independent studies have shown that marijuana relieves the pain and suffering of patients with serious illnesses such as cancer, AIDS, HIV, and glaucoma. Components of the marijuana plant reduce patient suffering by relieving nausea and enhancing appetite. Since marijuana has medical benefits, physicians should be able to legally recommend, and patients should be able to legally use, marijuana for medical purposes.

2. The measure provides sufficient state oversight of the medical use of marijuana to prevent use for recreational purposes. The oversight is provided through a confidential patient registry which will be maintained by a designated state health agency. The state health agency is permitted to share information contained in the registry with law enforcement officials only to verify that individuals arrested for the possession or use of marijuana are listed on the registry.

Arguments Against

1. There is no requirement for a prescription, or any quality control or testing standards for marijuana, and no control over strength, dosage, or frequency of use, such as those required for other medicinal drugs. The amount of THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, varies in every marijuana plant. Care-givers are not medically trained. Marijuana is an addictive drug that causes negative health effects and should be subject to testing by the federal Food and Drug Administration to be legalized for prescription use. Legalization of marijuana is unnecessary because of the availability of the synthetic drug Marinol, which has been found to relieve nausea and increase appetite. Marinol has been approved, and is regulated by, the Food and Drug Administration for prescription.

2. The amendment is worded to allow anyone, not just the seriously ill, to smoke marijuana. Because the measure does not provide a precise description of what qualifies as a serious illness, anyone with chronic or severe pain may be immune from prosecution for marijuana possession and use. The workload of state law enforcement officials will increase because they will be required to check the state registry every time an individual is arrested for marijuana possession or use.

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AMENDMENT 19

Title and Text MEDICAL USE OF MARIJUANA

An amendment to the Colorado Constitution authorizing the medical use of marijuana for persons suffering from debilitating medical conditions, and, in connection therewith, establishing an affirmative defense to Colorado criminal laws for patients and their primary care-givers relating to the medical use of marijuana; establishing exceptions to Colorado criminal laws for patients and primary care-givers in lawful possession of a registry identification card for medical marijuana use and for physicians who advise patients or provide them with written documentation as to such medical marijuana use; defining "debilitating medical condition" and authorizing the state health agency to approve other medical conditions or treatments as debilitating medical conditions; requiring preservation of seized property interests that had been possessed, owned, or used in connection with a claimed medical use of marijuana and limiting forfeiture of such interests; establishing and maintaining a confidential state registry of patients receiving an identification card for the medical use of marijuana and defining eligibility for receipt of such a card and placement on the registry; restricting access to information in the registry; establishing procedures for issuance of an identification card; authorizing fees to cover administrative costs associated with the registry; specifying the form and amount of marijuana a patient may possess and restrictions on its use; setting forth additional requirements for the medical use of marijuana by patients less than eighteen years old; directing enactment of implementing legislation and criminal penalties for certain offenses; requiring the state health agency designated by the governor to make application forms available to residents of Colorado for inclusion on the registry; limiting a health insurer's liability on claims relating to the medical use of marijuana; and providing that no employer must accommodate medical use of marijuana in the workplace.

Be it Enacted by the People of the State of Colorado:

AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF COLORADO, AMENDING ARTICLE XVIII, ADDING A NEW SECTION TO READ:

Section 14. Medical use of marijuana for persons suffering from debilitating medical conditions.

(1) As used in this section, these terms are defined as follows.

(a) "Debilitating medical condition" means:

(I) Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or treatment for such conditions;

(II) A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition, or treatment for such conditions, which produces, for a specific patient, one or more of the following, and for which, in the professional opinion of the patients physician, such condition or conditions reasonably may be alleviated by the medical use of marijuana: cachexia; severe pain; severe nausea; seizures, including those that are characteristic of epilepsy; or persistent muscle spasms, including those that are characteristic of multiple sclerosis; or

(III) Any other medical condition, or treatment for such condition, approved by the state health agency, pursuant to its rule making authority or its approval of any petition submitted by a patient or physician as provided in this section.

(b) "Medical use" means the acquisition, possession, production, use, or transportation of marijuana or paraphernalia related to the administration of such marijuana to address the symptoms or effects of a patient's debilitating medical condition, which may be authorized only after a diagnosis of the patient's debilitating medical condition by a physician or physicians, as provided by this section.

(c) "Parent" means a custodial mother or father of a patient under the age of eighteen years, any person having custody of a patient under the age of eighteen years, or any person serving as a legal guardian for a patient under the age of eighteen years.

(d) "Patient" means a person who has a debilitating medical condition.

(e) "Physician" means a doctor of medicine who maintains, in good standing, a license to practice medicine issued by the state of Colorado.

(f) "Primary care-giver" means a person, other than the patient and the patient's physician, who is eighteen years of age or older and has significant responsibility for managing the wellbeing of a patient who has a debilitating medical condition.

(g) "Registry identification card" means that document, issued by the state health agency, which identifies a patient authorized to engage in the medical use of marijuana and such patient's primary care-giver, if any has been designated.

(h) "State health agency" means that public health related entity of state government designated by the governor to establish and maintain a confidential registry of patients authorized to engage in the medical use of marijuana and enact rules to administer this program.

(i) "Usable form of marijuana" means the seeds, leaves, buds, and flowers of the plant (genus) cannabis, and any mixture or preparation thereof, which are appropriate for medical use as provided in this section, but excludes the plant's stalks, stems, and roots.

(j) "Written documentation" means a statement signed by a patient's physician or copies of the patients pertinent medical records.

(2) (a) Except as otherwise provided in subsections (5), (6), and (8) of this section, a patient or primary care-giver charged with a violation of the state's criminal laws related to the patients medical use of marijuana will be deemed to have established an affirmative defense to such allegation where:

(I) The patient was previously diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition,

(II) The patient was advised by his or her physician, in the context of a bona fide physician-patient relationship, that the patient might benefit from the medical use of marijuana in connection with a debilitating medical condition; and

(III) The patient and his or her primary caregiver were collectively in possession of amounts of marijuana only as permitted under this section.

This affirmative defense shall not exclude the assertion of any other defense where a patient or primary caregiver is charged with a violation of state law related to the patientís medical use of marijuana.

(b) Effective June 1, 1999, it shall be an exception from the state's criminal laws for any patient or primary care-giver in lawful possession of a registry identification card to engage or assist in the medical use of marijuana, except as otherwise provided in subsections (5) and (8) of this section.

(c) It shall be an exception from the state's criminal laws for any physician to:

(I) Advise a patient whom the physician has diagnosed as having a debilitating medical condition, about the risks and benefits of medical use of marijuana or that he or she might benefit from the medical use of marijuana, provided that such advice is based upon the physician's contemporaneous assessment of the patient's medical history and current medical condition and a bona fide physician-patient relationship; or

(II) Provide a patient with written documentation, based upon the physicianís contemporaneous assessment of the patient's medical history and current medical condition and a bona fide physician-patient relationship, stating that the patient has a debilitating medical condition and might benefit from the medical use of marijuana. No physician shall be denied any rights or privileges for the acts authorized by this subsection.

(d) Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions, no person, including a patient or primary caregiver, shall be entitled to the protection of this section for his or her acquisition, possession, manufacture, production, use, sale, distribution, dispensing, or transportation of marijuana for any use other than medical use.

(e) Any property interest that is possessed, owned, or used in connection with the medical use of marijuana or acts incidental to such use, shall not be harmed, neglected, injured, or destroyed while in the possession of state or local law enforcement officials where such property has been seized in connection with the claimed medical use of marijuana. Any such property interest shall not be forfeited under any provision of state law providing for the forfeiture of property other than as a sentence imposed after conviction of a criminal offense or entry of a plea of guilty to such offense.

Marijuana and paraphernalia seized by state or local law enforcement officials from a patient or primary caregiver in connection with the claimed medical use of marijuana shall be returned immediately upon the determination of the district attorney or his or her designee that the patient or primary caregiver is entitled to the protection contained in this section as may be evidenced, for example, by a decision not to prosecute, the dismissal of charges, or acquittal.

(3) The state health agency shall create and maintain a confidential registry of patients who have applied for and are entitled to receive a registry identification card according to the criteria set forth in this subsection, effective June 1, 1999.

(a) No person shall be permitted to gain access to any information about patients in the state health agency's confidential registry, or any information otherwise maintained by the state health agency about physicians and primary caregivers, except for authorized employees of the state health agency in the course of their official duties and authorized employees of state or local law enforcement agencies which have stopped or arrested a person who claims to be engaged in the medical use of marijuana and in possession of a registry identification card or its functional equivalent, pursuant to paragraph (e) of this subsection (3). Authorized employees of state or local law enforcement agencies shall be granted access to the information contained within the state health agency's confidential registry only for the purpose of verifying that an individual who has presented a registry identification card to a state or local law enforcement official is lawfully in possession of such card.

(b) In order to be placed on the state's confidential registry for the medical use of marijuana, a patient must reside in Colorado and submit the completed application form adopted by the state health agency, including the following information, to the state health agency:

(I) The original or a copy of written documentation stating that the patient has been diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition and the physician's conclusion that the patient might benefit from the medical use of marijuana,

(II) The name, address, date of birth, and social security number of the patient,

(III) The name, address, and telephone number of the patient's physician-, and

(IV) The name and address of the patient's primary caregiver, if one is designated at the time of application.

(c) Within thirty days of receiving the information referred to in sub-paragraphs (3)(b)(I)(IV), the state health agency shall verify medical information contained in the patient's written documentation. The agency shall notify the applicant that his or her application for a registry identification card has been denied if the agency's review of such documentation discloses that: the information required pursuant to paragraph (3)(b) of this section has not been provided or has been falsified; the documentation fails to state that the patient has a debilitating medical condition specified in this section or by state health agency rule; or the physician does not have a license to practice medicine issued by the state of Colorado. Otherwise, not more than five days after verifying such information, the state health agency shall issue one serially numbered registry identification card to the patient, stating:

(I) The patient's name, address, date of birth, and social security number;

(II) That the patient's name has been certified to the state health agency as a person who has a debilitating medical condition, whereby the patient may address such condition with the medical use of marijuana;

(III) The date of issuance of the registry identification card and the date of expiration of such card, which shall be one year from the date of issuance; and

(IV) The name and address of the patient's primary caregiver, if any is designated at the time of application.

(d) Except for patients applying pursuant to subsection (6) of this section, where the state health agency, within thirty-five days of receipt of an application, fails to issue a registry identification card or fails to issue verbal or written notice of denial of such application, the patients application for such card will be deemed to have been approved. Receipt shall be deemed to have occurred upon delivery to the state health agency, or deposit in the United States mails. Notwithstanding the foregoing, no application shall be deemed received prior to June 1, 1999.

A patient who is questioned by any state or local law enforcement official about his or her medical use of marijuana shall provide a copy of the application submitted to the state health agency, including the written documentation and proof of the date of mailing or other transmission of the written documentation for delivery to the state health agency, which shall be accorded the same legal effect as a registry identification card, until such time as the patient receives notice that the application has been denied.

(e) A patient whose application has been denied by the state health agency may not reapply during the six months following the date of the denial and may not use an application for a registry identification card as provided in paragraph (3)(d) of this section. The denial of a registry identification card shall be considered a final agency action. Only the patient whose application has been denied shall have standing to contest the agency action.

(f) When there has been a change in the name, address, physician, or primary caregiver of a patient who has qualified for a registry identification card, that patient must notify the state health agency of any such change within ten days. A patient who has not designated a primary care-giver at the time of application to the state health agency may do so in writing at any time during the effective period of the registry identification card, and the primary care-giver may act in this capacity after such designation. To maintain an effective registry identification card, a patient must annually resubmit, at least thirty days prior to the expiration date stated on the registry identification card, updated written documentation to the state health agency, as well as the name and address of the patient's primary care-giver, if any is designated at such time.

(g) Authorized employees of state or local law enforcement agencies shall immediately notify the state health agency when any person in possession of a registry identification card has been determined by a court of law to have willfully violated the provisions of this section or its implementing legislation, or has pled guilty to such offense.

(h) A patient who no longer has a debilitating medical condition shall return his or her registry identification card to the state health agency within twenty-four hours of receiving such diagnosis by his or her physician.

(i) The state health agency may determine and levy reasonable fees to pay for any direct or indirect administrative costs associated with its role in this program.

(4) (a) A patient may engage in the medical use of marijuana, with no more marijuana than is medically necessary to address a debilitating medical condition. A patient's medical use of marijuana, within the following limits, is lawful:

(I) No more than two ounces of a usable form of marijuana; and

(II) No more than six marijuana plants, with three or fewer being mature, flowering plants that are producing a usable form of marijuana.

(b) For quantities of marijuana in excess of these amounts, a patient or his or her primary care-giver may raise as an affirmative defense to charges of violation of state law that such greater amounts were medically necessary to address the patient's debilitating medical condition.

(5) (a) No patient shall:

(I) Engage in the medical use of marijuana in away that endangers the health or well-being of any person; or

(II) Engage in the medical use of marijuana in plain view of, or in a place open to, the general public.

(b) In addition to any other penalties provided by law, the state health agency shall revoke for a period of one year the registry identification card of any patient found to have willfully violated the provisions of this section or the implementing legislation adopted by the general assembly.

(6) Notwithstanding paragraphs (2)(a) and (3)(d) of this section, no patient under eighteen years of age shall engage in the medical use of marijuana unless:

(a) Two physicians have diagnosed the patient as having a debilitating medical condition;

(b) One of the physicians referred to in paragraph (6)(a) has explained the possible risks and benefits of medical use of marijuana to the patient and each of the patient's parents residing in Colorado;

(c) The physicians referred to in paragraph (6)(b) has provided the patient with the written documentation, specified in subparagraph (3)(b)(I);

(d) Each of the patient's parents residing in Colorado consent in writing to the state health agency to permit the patient to engage in the medical use of marijuana;

(e) A parent residing in Colorado consents in writing to serve as a patient's primary caregiver;

(f) A parent serving as a primary caregiver completes and submits an application for a registry identification card as provided in subparagraph (3)(b) of this section and the written consents referred to in paragraph (6)(d) to the state health agency;

(g) The state health agency approves the patient's application and transmits the patient's registry identification card to the parent designated as a primary caregiver;

(h) The patient and primary caregiver collectively possess amounts of marijuana no greater than those specified in subparagraph (4)(a)(I) and (II); and

(i) The primary caregiver controls the acquisition of such marijuana and the dosage and frequency of its use by the patient

(7) Not later than March 1, 1999, the governor shall designate, by executive order, the state health agency as defined in paragraph (1)(g) of this section.

(8) Not later than April 30,1999, the General Assembly shall define such terms and enact such legislation as may be necessary for implementation of this section, as well as determine and enact criminal penalties for:

(a) Fraudulent representation of a medical condition by a patient to a physician, state health agency, or state or local law enforcement official for the purpose of falsely obtaining a registry identification card or avoiding arrest and prosecution;

(b) Fraudulent use or theft of any person's registry identification card to acquire, possess, produce, use, sell, distribute, or transport marijuana, including but not limited to cards that are required to be returned where patients are no longer diagnosed as having a debilitating medical condition;

(c) Fraudulent production or counterfeiting of, or tampering with, one or more registry identification cards; or

(d) Breach of confidentiality of information provided to or by the state health agency.

(9) Not later than June 1, 1999, the state health agency shall develop and make available to residents of Colorado an application form for persons seeking to be listed on the confidential registry of patients. By such date, the state health agency shall also enact rules of administration, including but not limited to rules governing the establishment and confidentiality of the registry, the verification of medical information, the issuance and form of registry identification cards, communications with law enforcement officials about registry identification cards that have been suspended where a patient is no longer diagnosed as having a debilitating medical condition, and the manner in which the agency may consider adding debilitating medical conditions to the list provided in this section. Beginning June 1, 1999, the state health agency shall accept physician or patient initiated petitions to add debilitating medical conditions to the list provided in this section and, after such hearing as the state health agency deems appropriate, shall approve or deny such petitions within one hundred eighty days of submission. The decision to approve or deny a petition shall be considered a final agency action.

(10)(a)No governmental, private, or any other health insurance provider shall be required to he liable for any claim for reimbursement for the medical use of marijuana.

(b) Nothing in this section shall require any employer to accommodate the medical use of marijuana in any work place.

(11) Unless otherwise provided by this section, all provisions of this section shall become effective upon official declaration of the vote hereon by proclamation of the governor, pursuant to article V, section (I)(4), and shall apply to acts or offenses committed on or after that date.

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